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The technological disruption of labour markets creates both challenges and opportunities for people. The creation of labour markets that enable everyone to participate regardless of race, ethnicity, or background has been a long-time goal of many organizations. While some advances have been made with regard to the share of women in the workforce, and laws barring discrimination, a lack of inclusivity has persisted - not least in relation to women and young people from developing countries. According to the World Economic Forum’s 2020 Global Gender Gap Report, there is a necessity for action as women occupy just 21% of the ministerial positions in the world, and spend at least twice as much time on unpaid work as men. Meanwhile the integration of migrants and refugees into labour markets requires linking up a wider array of stakeholders, supporting entrepreneurship, and facilitating the identification, assessment, and validation of skills. There is more to addressing inclusion than simply reforming education - research has shown that qualified women often exit the technology industry because they have concerns about their work environment, and a lack of ethnic diversity and ageism have been documented at some of the fastest-growing companies. Some of the most common measures used to combat bias include diversity training - and it has been shown that shifting social norms and affecting the collective mindset can be more effective than solely focusing on changing individual outlooks. The influence of TV and the media in general appear to be of particular importance in this regard, as evidenced by a Brazilian study on the effect of telenovelas on decisions about family size and female participation in the labour market made by their audiences. The COVID-19 pandemic has increasingly made work virtual, which has had an impact on teamwork and interaction. In addition, technologies such as blockchain have created greater entrepreneurship opportunities, as they make traditional intermediaries less relevant. In the coming years, we can expect that increasing globalization will give even more people the opportunity to work virtually (and independently) from anywhere in the world. This means that more will theoretically be exposed to employment opportunities that were previously inaccessible. In order to truly boost the inclusivity of labour markets, however, this trend must be accompanied by initiatives to re-regulate employment and bolster social protection systems.

Inclusive Labour Markets

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Inclusive Labour Markets